haikai

A Grief Reobserved: a #Prosery #AmericanSentence #haibun

Terrance Richmond
(photo courtesy of Mike Hellgren‏Verified account (WJZ 13CBS Baltimore))

We found out that our friend and colleague, Terry Richmond, died while vacationing in the Dominican Republic.

The news came right before we began the 2018-2019 school year. Shocked with grief, our school came together, organizing a memorial during the first week, and meeting his mother. Her steadfast faith and grace inspired us, even as we tried to console her.

The memorial came. We shared our memories of him. We comforted each other as best we good. We let him go, went through our year.

Then two days ago, CBS News Baltimore broadcast the story of his mother seeking answers. Dominican authorities had declared Terry’s death a heart attack. His mother learned, however, that he had suffered a fractured skull, bruised ribs, and bruises on his knuckles.

Meanwhile, at least three other American tourists died myseriously in DR.

When faraway an interrupted cry carries on.

for dVerse Poets’ inaugural Prosery (pubtended by Bjorn).

Prosery is a new micro-fiction feature, in which we write a 144 word prose story. Adhering to my haikai ethos, I wrote a haibun that features an American Sentence conclusion. Beat poet Allen Ginsberg created the American Sentence, a grammatical sentence of no more than seventeen syllables, as an English language alternative to haiku.

The pub is open! Come join us!

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15 replies »

    • We had heard that Terry died of a heart attack. Then the story broke about Terry’s fractured skull, bruised ribs and knuckles. The coroner’s report looks suspicious in that light, at least to me.

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