haikai

#Haikai Challenge #27 (3/31/18): White Lily or Azalea (tsutsuji) #haiku #senryu #haibun #tanka #haiga #renga

xl_Easter_Sunday

courtesy of  Walsingham | National Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham

 

 

Spring continues to emerge, Haijin! The growing warmth of the season has melted all but the most stubborn patches of snow. Here’s to those of you that joined in the spirit of transformation of this season by sharing in last week’s challenge, Triduum. You’ll forgive my own indulgance. I called my own number and shared the tanaga-prose that I composed for dVerse and Real Toads this week past.

 

Speaking of which, last week marked six months of the #Haikai Challenge. You go, Haijin!

 

 Haikai Challenge Participants

 

1. Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr
2. Jane Dougherty
3. Vivian Zems
4. Jules
5. Xenia Tran
6. Linda Lee Lyberg
7. Revived Writer
8. lynn
9. Janice (Ontheland)
10. Revived Writer (2)
11. Frank J. Tassone

Powered by… Mister Linky’s Magical Widgets.

 

Now, to this week’s challenge.

 

Easter Sunday is tomorrow. The most important feast in Christianity, Easter celebrates the Ressurection of Jesus Christ. It also symbolizes transformation: The cracking open of the chrysalis, and the emergance of the butterfly! What a unique opportunity this holiday affords us to reflect on some of the most beautiful blossoms of the season!

This week, our kigo will be either the Easter Lily, or the Azalea(tsutsuji).

 

According to the Holiday Spot:

Lily
lily

A popular symbol of the Easter festival, the white lily is held as the traditional Easter Flower and represents love and hope. The single flower stem originating from a bulb represents the resurrection of Christ three days after his apparent death by crucifixion. Legend has it that white lilies were grown at the place where drops of blood fell from Jesus Christ’s body. Some Catholic nations regard white lilies as the symbol of the purity and divinity of Jesus Christ and dedicate them to his mother, Virgin Mary. This is the reason why churches are decorated with white lilies during Easter.

Gifting white lilies to someone during this time indicates that you are very happy to be acquainted with the recipient. Giving yellow lilies to a person represents your request or advice to him/her to “live for the moment”.

Azalea

azalea

A beautiful spring flower, the azalea is famous for its elegant color and appearance and forms a symbol of different emotions like temperance and passion. Gifting it to someone on Easter indicates you want the recipient to take good care of himself/herself for your sake.

 

Write the Haikai poem of your choice that states or alludes to either the White Lily or the Azalea (tsutsuji).

 

As always:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

 

 

Happy Easter, Haijin! Happy Spring (again)! Happy April Fool’s Day, for those so inclined. And for the brave and the bold, have a great National Poetry Month/ #napowrimo!

 

 

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25 replies »

  1. Happy Easter to you and your family. Since my mother died recently, we are laying low for Easter. No kids around anyway. Here in this neck of the south, azaleas don’t bloom until end of april – mid-May. I always gave my mother a new azalea for her to plant in her yard. At this house we bought about 20 years ago, the builders/owners loved them. I went around and counted 33 azaleas planted around the house and on the property – purest white to deepest red and all the colours in between. My husband started planting deciduous azaleas about 10 years ago – in the most startling colours of gold, yellow, orange!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Six months… I almost started at the beginning. 😉
    I may get to those earlier prompts yet… (or not).
    Thank you for being a gracious host.
    Best to all.
    I hope to add to this post soon. I already did my daily. And I haven’t a theme at all for next month…

    Liked by 1 person

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