haikai

Solsticing

Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

The canopy of maple leaves bathes in sunlight on the Summer Solstice. Still for a moment, the legion of leaves ripple lie a stadium crowd doing the wave.

Despite the abundance of daylight left on this longest of days, afternoon shadows creep across the front yard. The street already basks in the shade.

I’ve spent my Solstice grading the last-minute assignment submissions of students desperate to graduate, or dodge summer school. I spend it now awaiting a parent’s completed google form about her daughter. I will spend it on the deck, enjoying the dinner whose aroma already has my mouth watering.

But while Summer officially begins on this traditionally midsummer day, I struggle with the fatigue with which I awoke. And all the endless light of this longest day does is taunt me with the promise of my bed.

A promise that won’t be kept until a nightfall too long in coming.

this Solstice

the air conditioner

hums along

I’m hosting Haibun Monday over at dVerse, where we’re writing about the Solstice. The pub is open! Come join us!

Categories: haikai, haiku community

Tagged as: , , , ,

17 replies »

  1. I too am feeling the heat this solstice. I like how you captured the peace of the moment, ‘the legion of leaves ripple lie a stadium crowd doing the wave.’ It’s a kind of lazy, hazy hard-to-do-anything weather. I hope you get some relief soon!

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  2. Frank – I hope you get some rest soon! This was very human and relatable 🙂

    BTW, could you please explain to me (in relatively simple terms) how many syllables haikus actually need to have? Are there different kinds of haikus (in terms of syllable counts)? I understand that syllables in Japanese don’t necessarily translate exactly into syllables in other languages… so is it 5-7-5 in English and anything that’s less than that, which is considered a haiku?


    David

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  3. The hum of the air conditioner always lulls me. Ready for feet up for a much-deserved break, Frank. Thanks for giving more patience and wisdom than most by teaching this year-also online as a host for d’verse.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Waking with fatigue is not the best way to face the solstice. I hope a nap is rejuvenating, and dinner on the deck sounds a delightful close to the day!

    Liked by 1 person

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