haikai

#Haikai Challenge #81 (4/13/19): Pink Moon #haiku #senryu #haibun #tanka #haiga #renga


KIYOMI YOSHIMATSU / 500PXGETTY IMAGES

I hope you enjoyed the Cherry Blossoms, haijin! Seems many of you did! Congratulations to last week’s contributors:

Haikai Challenge Participants
1. Jane Dougherty
2. Tessa
3. Dwight L. Roth
4. ennle madresan
5. Jules @ fiction
6. The Dark Netizen
7. Deborah
8. Pat R
9. Shannon Blood
10. Janice
11. Helene Vaillant
12. Ken Gierke / rivrvlogr
13. Revived Writer

Powered by… Mister Linky’s Magical Widgets.

Onward!

It’s a big week coming up. Christians celebrate Holy Week, the last week of lent, which culminates in the Triduum–Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday. Tomorrow is Passion Sunday, in which many communities will hear the Gospel of the death of Christ. It all leads up to Easter!

Those not of the Christian persuasion have seen temperatures begin to rise (in the Northern Hemisphere) or fall (in the Southern). Trees may begin to bud, and some–like the Cherry and Dogwood–bloom. Frogs croak in unison, birdsongs fill the air, or leaves fall and birds/frogs fall silent.

Meanwhile, in the midst of all of this, comes the full moon, known in April as the Pink Moon:


In ancient times, it was common to track the seasons by the lunar calendar (as opposed to the solar calendar, which came later).
Native peoples once observed the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon. Time was not recorded by using the months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. As a result, many of the traditional names we use in The Old Farmer’s Almanac come from the Native Americans who interacted with American Colonists.
April’s full Moon is called the Full Pink Moon, heralding the appearance of the “moss pink,” or wild ground phlox—one of the early spring flowers.


Pink ground phlox, or “moss pink,” lends its name to the April Moon.

This week, write the haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that alludes to the Pink Moon.

As always:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

It’s getting warm. Why don’t you dance by the light of the moon, haijin?

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